September 11th, 2017

 

As the father of three adult offspring, I can say with certainty that parents never stop worrying about their children. Never.

As I write this — as CNN broadcasts from just beyond the eye of vicious Hurricane Irma — my wife and I sit by our phone and await an update from Son #2, who is sheltering in place on his college campus in South Florida. You never stop worrying; it’s part of the territory of being a parent. Kacy Faulconer gets it:

From the day you find out you’re pregnant to the day your kid graduates from high school, you never stop worrying about them. It’s just part of our job as parents, I guess. Even though I try not to be neurotic and over-protective with my kids, it’s only possible to “let it go” to a certain extent.

Someone has to worry about them!

Kids change a lot from newborn to teenager, but there are a surprising number of things to worry about when they’re little that you never stop worrying about, no matter how grown up they become.

 

Faulconer lists six things she will never stop worrying about when it comes to her kids’ health and safety:

1.  What They’re Eating.

2. If They’re Reading.

3. If They’re Getting Enough Sleep.

4. Whether They Have Friends.

5. If They’ve Had Their Shots.

6. Whether They’re Happy.

 

Depending on your level of worry (or paranoia), Brett Singer can find an app for you, including this one: “Find My Kids — Footprints”.

Ever wish you could know where your child is, all the time? Using GPS in real time,, this app helps you keep track of and automatically locate where your child goes with his phone. If he’s traveling alone, you can confirm that he arrived at a specific destination, or if he’s meeting up with friends, they can confirm each other’s locations. Location info is never shared with anyone else beyond those who have permission to see it, and data is saved for later review. Even though the app is free, parents will need to purchase a subscription for the tracking feature.

 

The “iEmergency ICE Family PRO” app is a handy, inexpensive mobile tool that stores important health information which can be easily accessed in an emergency:

ICE stands for “In Case of Emergency,” and this app allows parents to store important health data — allergies, prescriptions, and medical conditions such as diabetes — for an unlimited amount of family and friends. You can enter information about each person’s doctor and hospital affiliation, health insurance, and even attorney contacts. The idea is to put all the data you need access to in one easy-to-find place. A free version called ICE iEmergency LITE is also available, but it allows parents to store only three profiles with limited information.

 

Some mobile phone models offer similar tools as part of their platforms, such as Apple’s “Find My iPhone,” “Find My Friends,” and “Health — Medical ID” apps. But nothing beats picking up the phone and calling. Or FaceTime. That’s even better.

Boy, will he be surprised!

 

(Google Images)

 

One Response to The Paranoid Parent

  1. I think we worry more about our children’s happiness when they are adults because often there is little we can do to bring it about. Once you have a child, there will never be another day in your life without worry.

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  • MEET THE EDITOR

    Ned Ketyer, M.D.

    Ned Ketyer, M.D.

    Dr. Ketyer has special interests in developmental pediatrics and preventative medicine, specifically how nutrition and the environment affect health. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Vermont and his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School. He completed his residency at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh.

    As one of the founding physicians of Pediatric Alliance, PC, Dr. Ketyer served as its president from 1997-2004. He has been practicing general pediatrics at Pediatric Alliance since 1990. Dr. Ketyer and his wife have three boys and live in Pittsburgh's South Hills. 



  • Note: The information included in these posts is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice.

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